Emilee Rader bio photo

Emilee Rader

Associate Professor and AT&T Scholar @ Michigan State University

CV Email Calendar

Current Projects

Descriptions of my ongoing research projects are below. For information on my past projects, please click here.

Managing Privacy of Derived Data

Sensors, usage logs, and other forms of automated collection of personal data are becoming harder if not impossible to avoid; from personal health and fitness trackers to city-wide surveillance cameras to web application and server logs, they are a pervasive aspect of the physical and digital infrastructure around us. In isolation, sensor data may seem non-sensitive and harmless; however, aggregation produces derived data consisting of new insights and inferences that are not obvious to users and can be surprising, unsettling or harmful when used for unexpected purposes.

Consent (notice and choice) is the typical framework for data sharing rights and permissions regarding technology use. But when sensor data collection is automatic and requires no manual interaction from the user, it is difficult to imagine how people can be making informed decisions about their preferences. I am studying how to help people become better able to recognize situations when their behaviors produce data that might be used to infer information they and others might prefer not to reveal, and how to design mechanisms that provide support for coordination and social awareness about acceptable uses of derived data.

This project is supported by National Science Foundation under Grant No. CNS-1524296. For more information see https://bitlab.cas.msu.edu/privacy/.

  • Hautea, S., Nthala, N., Kollig, F., Ferraz, J.M., and Rader, E.. ““Assertive driver, I can imagine that”: Interpretations of Inferences from Driving Data.” Poster in 2021 Symposium on Usable Privacy and Security. 2021. ( Abstract, PDF, Poster )

  • Wash, R. and Rader, E.. “Prioritizing security over usability: Strategies for how people choose passwords.” Poster in 2021 Symposium on Usable Privacy and Security. 2021. ( Poster )

  • Nthala, N. and Rader, E.. “Towards a Conceptual Model for Provoking Privacy Speculation.” Poster in Poster presented at the 2020 Symposium on Usable Privacy and Security. 2020. ( Abstract, Link, PDF, Poster )

  • Emilee Rader, Samantha Hautea and Anjali Munasinghe. “I Have a Narrow Thought Process: Constraints on Explanations Connecting Inferences and Self-PerceptionsSymposium on Usable Privacy and Security (SOUPS). 2020. [IAPP SOUPS Privacy Award] ( Abstract, Link, PDF )

  • Jina Huh-Yoo and Emilee Rader. “It’s the Wild, Wild West: Lessons Learned From IRB Members’ Risk Perceptions Toward Digital Research DataProc. ACM Hum.-Comput. Interact.. Vol. 4 No. CSCW1 pp. Article 59 (May 2020). 2020. DOI: 10.1145/3392868. ( Abstract, PDF, ACM DL )

  • Hautea, S., Munasinghe, A., and Rader, E.. “That’s Not Me: Surprising Algorithmic Inferences.” Poster in Extended Abstracts of the 2020 CHI Conference On Human Factors In Computing Systems. 2020. DOI: 10.1145/3334480.3382816. ( Abstract, PDF, Poster )

  • Nthala, N. and Rader, E.. “Towards a Conceptual Model for Provoking Privacy Speculation.” Poster in Extended Abstracts of the 2020 CHI Conference On Human Factors In Computing Systems. 2020. DOI: 10.1145/3334480.3382816. ( Abstract, PDF )

  • Emilee Rader and Janine Slaker. “The Importance of Visibility for Folk Theories of Sensor DataSymposium on Usable Privacy and Security (SOUPS). Santa Clara, CA. July 2017. ( Abstract, Link, PDF )

  • Yumi Jung and Emilee Rader. “The Imagined Audience and Privacy Concern on Facebook: Differences Between Producers and ConsumersSocial Media + Society. Vol. 2 No. 2 2016. DOI: 10.1177/2056305116644615. ( Abstract, Link, PDF )

  • Yumi Jung and Emilee Rader. “Transitive Privacy Concern in Social Networks.” Poster in Symposium on Usable Privacy and Security (SOUPS). Menlo Park, CA. July 2014. ( PDF )

  • Emilee Rader. “Awareness of Behavioral Tracking and Information Privacy Concern in Facebook and GoogleSymposium on Usable Privacy and Security (SOUPS). Menlo Park, CA. July 2014. ( Abstract, Link, PDF )

Misdirected Email

Email is an essential tool for communication and social interaction that has been repurposed over the years as a broadcast medium connecting businesses with their customers, and as an authentication mechanism. These uses are enabled by the fact that the only barrier to reaching someone by email is knowing their email address. This feature has made email an attractive platform for scammers and a vector for security threats, but it also has another side-effect that is becoming increasingly common: misdirected email, or legitimate emails that are intended for somebody else but are sent to the wrong recipient. At best, misdirected email contributes to email overload; but at worst, sensitive private information can be revealed via misdirected email to unintended third parties. I am studying what causes misdirected email to be sent, how people on the receiving end deal with it, and what might be done to help both senders and recipients prevent it.